Effective altruism is littered with lowbrow articles. I thought I would contribute something a little more academic to our discourse, so I have written a listicle (sorrynotsorry) of what we can do to get the most out of the conference now that it’s over.

1. Track down the friends you made at EAG on Facebook and LinkedIn.

You could set up a time to hang out, online or in person or send through some of the photos you took, what you changed your mind about after the conference, or what you enjoyed about meeting them.

A reminder that just sending through any of these stickers is not condoned:

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Photo credit: Facebook

2. Add yourself to Facebook groups

Love it or hate it, it’s how most of us stay in touch and encounter new ideas and articles. At least this way, you can be productive while you’re unproductive.

  1. EA Global Alumni

  2. The EA main page

  3. Your local group (e.g. EA Melbourne)

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Photo credit: Melody Guan/ Huffington Post

3. Or start a new group

If your local group doesn’t exist yet, you could create one. It’s pretty easy to create a Facebook group to see who else is around. Your first event could be just meeting your friend in a pub. Jonathan Courtney from Giving What We Can helps set up EA chapters for his day job, and I’m sure would be more than happy to help.

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Cows contemplating their options in moovement building

Photo credit: X posid/ publicdomainpictures.net

4. Read a book

Read your copy of the EA Handbook or Will MacAskill’s book, Doing Good Better. Or the FAQ. Not the FAQ for the DOD, though.

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The most comfortable way to read a book: standing, staring into the sun, and holding the book in front of your face

Photo credit: kaboompics/ Pixabay

5. Set aside some time to think about your career

Read the 80,000 Hours career guide, or try their career suggester. Most people don’t update enough on the basis of new information. Not you, you’re a Bayesian beast. You change your mind like crazy.

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Running up boxes isn’t the best for earning to give, but it does have good career capital

Photo credit: geralt/ Pixabay

6. Take the pledge

On the Sunday of the Melbourne event, two awesome attendees took the Giving What We Can pledge. If you haven’t already done so, it’s a great way to make a huge, ongoing impact. Or, if you’re not quite ready for the challenge, why not try giving?

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Take the (p)ledge with friends

Photo credit: Knipsologe/ Pixabay

7. Upskill

Try to upskill your rationality or become more productive by reading this or signing up to a free trial of accountability training. You could also do a MOOC to improve your career capital.

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I searched for rationality and productivity, and got pictures of bread both times. What?

Photo credit: Pixabay

8. Start or join a project

Had a brilliant project idea? Email your friend about it, or post it on .impact.

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I chose a serious photo to keep you guessing

Photo credit: StartupStockPhotos/ Pixabay

9. Fill your time

Try the Hiltons’ task recommender, or do something small but effective from this list.

The one secret to good quotes is simplifying and vague-ifying

Photo: News Feed Eradicator

10. Donate

To highly effective charities. ’Nuff said.

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Spend your green circle things wisely

Photo credit: OpenClipartVectors/ Pixabay

11. Apply

Apply to work at an EA-oriented organisation, such as GiveWell or the Centre for Effective Altruism. See what’s available in the Facebook group.

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Most work doesn’t involve holding gears

Photo credit: geralt/ Pixabay

12. Still stuck?

Speak to the team at EA Action. They specialise in providing free advice about what concrete things you can do today to have a big impact.

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Not that type of action

Photo credit: Pixabay

 

Cross-posted on the EA Forum and the EA UNSW blog.